Suckerfish - ORD Menu

Eric D. Richards

My research program focuses on basic attentional processes and the underlying cortical systems that support these processes. Within this broad theme, I am especially interested in: vision science, divided-attention, dual-task processing, object processing, aging, and neuroimaging. My research interests stem from a desire to better understand the relative contributions of attentional processing to featural and object processing. In addition, I aim to understand how we process visual information in more real-world-like conditions. In the real world multiple visual objects constantly bombard our visual system. These visual objects also vary in complexity, and often require us to divide our attention between objects and tasks. It is within these real-world-like contexts that I hope to uncover the degree to which aging impacts either negatively or positively on individuals’ performance.
eric.jpg
Degrees: 
  • B.Sc. (UNB)
  • M.A. (Manitoba)
  • Ph.D. (Waterloo)
Position: 
Assistant Professor
Department: 
psychology
Faculty: 
Arts
Phone: 
1 902-566-0489
Research Interests: 
  • basic attentional processes and the underlying cortical systems
  • vision science, divided-attention, dual-task processing, object processing, aging, and neuroimaging.
Citations: 
  1. Richards, E., Bennett, P.J., & Sekuler, A.B.(in press). Aging, learning and the useful field of view. Vision Research
     
  2. Richards, E., Tombu, M., Stolz, J., & Jolicoeur, P. (2004). Features of Perception: Exploring the Perception of Change in a Psychological Refractory Period Paradigm. Visual Cognition, 11, 751-780.
     
  3. Singer, M. & Richards, E. (2005). Representing complex narrative goal structures: Competing memory-based and situational influences. Discourse Processes, June.
     
  4. Singer, M., Gagnon, N., & Richards, E. (2002). Question answering strategy: The effect of mixing test delays. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 56, 28-64.
     
  5. Richards, E. & Singer, M. (2001). Representation of complex goal structures in narrative comprehension. Discourse Processes, 31(2), 111-135.
Current Collaborators (non-UPEI): 
  • Allison Sekuler, PhD (Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
  • Patrick Bennett, PhD (Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario